Stanley Jaki Lectures at Seton Hall University

The Distinguished Lecture of the Department of Physics at Seton Hall University is from the year 2011 dedicated in honor of Fr. Stanley L. Jaki O.S.B..

2012

Father George Coyne. S.J., Ph.D. the McDevitt Chair of Religious Philosophy at the McDevitt Center for Creativity and Innovation of Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York presented the annual Fr. Stanley L. Jaki, O.S.B. Distinguished Lecture of the Department of Physics at Seton Hall University on Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 6 p.m. The special lecture has been held in the Jubilee Hall Auditorium in Jubilee Hall on Seton Hallís South Orange campus and is part of the President's Advisory Council Distinguished Guest Lecturer Series sponsored by the Presidentís Advisory Council members.

A video of the lecture has been put online by the Seton Hall University. It can be found here.

George Coyne is a Catholic priest, member of the Society of Jesus or Jesuits, and a world renowned astronomer. Father Coyne served as the Director of the Vatican Observatory from 1978 to 2006, and is currently President of the Vatican Observatory Foundation. He is considered to be one of the leading intellectuals on the topics of the interaction between science and religion.

Fr. Coyneís lecture entitled The Dance of the Fertile Universe: Chance and Destiny Embrace explores the immense quantity and variety in the universe which contains about 100 billion galaxies each of which contain on the average 200 billion stars. The lectures focus is on the scientific explanation of how the life and death of stars have provided the building blocks necessary for the evolution of life. There is then a reflection on the question, if human life came about by chance or by necessity? The lecture further reflects on the vast "fertility" of the universe surveyed from the aspect of the best of modern scientific understanding. A final reflection is provided on the question: Did God do it? In his attempt to answer this question Father Coyne discusses how important it is to respect the richness of both religious faith and of scientific research.

The original news from Seton Hall University can be found here.

A picture taken after the Lecture can be found here.

2011

Professor Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey has been the inaugural lecturer of the Fr. Stanley L. Jaki, O.S.B. Distinguished Lecture of the Department of Physics at Seton Hall University on Monday, November 14, 2011 at 6 p.m. The special lecture has been held in the Helen Lerner Amphitheatre (SC 101) in McNulty Hall and is part of the President's Advisory Council Distinguished Guest Lecturer Series sponsored by the President's Advisory Council members.

A video of the lecture has been put online by the Seton Hall University. It can be found here.

Freeman Dyson is considered to be one of the greatest living thinkers and intellectuals on the topics of science and technology. His ideas have had a profound and widely regarded impact on many fields - physics, biology, history, philosophy, and theology.

Professor Dyson's lecture entitled "Living through Four Revolutions" provides a first-hand witness reflection on the history of science and technology over the last half century. In particular, his contemplation is about the four modern scientific and technological revolutions which were space, nuclear energy, genomics, and electronic computing. He looks at how these revolutions started, how they slowly transformed the world during the past half century, and how they are still transforming it today.

The announce of the Lecture can be found here.

The original news from Seton Hall University can be found here.